Henri Matisse / Petit bois clair Presented by Fairhead Fine Art Ltd

Henri MATISSE - Petit bois clair

Presented by Fairhead Fine Art Ltd

  • Year
    1906
  • Technical
    Woodcut
  • Image size
    0,0 x 0,0 cm / 0.0 x 0.0 in
  • Paper size
    48,0 x 0,0 cm / 18.9 x 0.0 in
  • Edition
    50 - there were also 2 trial proofs
  • Price
    On demand
  • Reference
    Literature: Claude Duthuit: Henri Matisse, Catalogue Raisonne des ouvrages illustres, Volume 1 : Number 318, page 248 Stephen Coppel “The Fauve Woodcut” , Print Quarterly ; Vol. 16, No. 1 (MARCH 1999), pp. 3-33 (31 pages) Alfred H Barr, MOMA : “Mati
  • Visit(s)
    97
  • Condition
Henri MATISSE - Petit bois clair

Henri Matisse (1869-1954)

Title: Petit bois clair
Small Light Woodcut
Medium: Original woodcut, 1906, on Velin Van Gelder paper, with the initials of the artist in the design to the left of the image, signed by the artist in pencil, lower right. With full margins.
Edition: 50 - there were also 2 trial proofs
Size: Paper size: 460 x 285 mms; Image size: 342 x 266 mms
Literature: Claude Duthuit: Henri Matisse, Catalogue Raisonne des ouvrages illustres, Volume 1 : Number 318, page 248
Stephen Coppel “The Fauve Woodcut” , Print Quarterly ; Vol. 16, No. 1 (MARCH 1999), pp. 3-33 (31 pages)
Alfred H Barr, MOMA : “Matisse: His art and his Public” Pages 99 & 322 (Illustrated)
Printed by: Auguste Clot, Paris, France
Public Collections:
MOMA, New York - Gift of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Fund
National Gallery of Art, Washington DC, USA
Art Gallery of New South Wales
Centre Pompidou, Paris, Gift of Mme Marie Matisse, 1985
Provenance:
Pace Prints, New York (Their label verso)
From an Upper East Side, NYC collection
Exhibitions:
March 1906 Galerie Druet (One man show)
17/10/2013 - 16/11/2013 Pace Prints, New York “Matisse Prints 1906 - 1950” (our piece exhibited)
2018: Bernard Jacobson Gallery, London : “Matisse prints:) ” (Another example for the same edition)
Note: Matisse’s woodcuts, like his early lithographs, were first shown in 1906 at the Galerie Druet. The critic, Georges Desvallieres, said of these that he saw “wilful deformations, a bit too premeditated”. Like all his Fauvist works the Woodcuts were first received with scant praise. With the passage of time their vitality and strength has later been appreciated. At one time Matisse was regarded as being as radical as Picasso. Rarest and least represented among the printmaking techniques is the woodcut. Matisse created only three during his career, concentrating on the method from 1906-07. During the period in which he made this and other memorable prints, he was the acknowledged, if reluctant, leader of the Fauvist Movement. Rather than an organised school, fauvism represented a propensity in art that took late impressionist and post-impressionist pictoriality towards something more raw and more expressive. Historically, fauvism is a bridge to expressionism. Brutal reductions of form as much as brilliance of colour characterised the style. This black-on-white woodcut is thus a wholly fauvist work. Despite the simplicity of the composition, Matisse convinces the viewer of two things: first, that this is a record of a real and fully-rounded human presence studied from life; and, conversely, that it is no more than a terse and primitivistic arrangement of lines deployed across a surface. The tension between these extremes, and the fact of their simultaneous functioning, contributes to the almost fetishistic status of the work.Though the composition is void of colour, the linework is signature of his technique. The busy, geometric lines of the background emphasise the delicate, curved lines and the lack of defined musculature of the figure in the foreground. While Matisse worked in a variety of printing techniques, this woodcut is a rare and significant example from this oeuvre. 

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